Knowledge for better food systems

Showing results for: Sugar

Sugar in the form of glucose is the basic source of energy for the cells in our body. According to WHO adults should keep intakes of refined sugar to no more than 25 grams (6 teaspoons) daily, but in countries such as Mexico, Brazil and Russia and many EU countries, the per capita average exceeds 100 grams daily while for China it is around 30 grams. High sugar consumption has been linked to obesity, diabetes 2, cardiovascular disease, dementia, macular degeneration, and tooth decay. As a result, some countries are now imposing a sugar tax in attempts to reduce consumption. Sugary foods typically have a low carbon footprint. Sugarcane, however, which is cultivated both for food and biofuel, occupies large land areas, has cleared valuable ecosystems around the tropics, is water intensive and often requires high pesticide use. Pollution runoff from processing plants is another associated problem. Investigations into the sugarcane industry regularly cite problems with working conditions (child-labor, poor salaries and poor labour standards).

4 April 2017

Public Health England(PHE) has published new guidelines setting out the approaches the food industry should take to reduce the net amount of sugar children consume through everyday food. 

24 January 2017

A new patent by Nestlé scientists promises a reduction in sugar content in their chocolate and confectionary within years. 

18 October 2016

In a new report, entitled ‘Fiscal policies for diet and the prevention of noncommunicable diseases’, the World Health Organisation (WHO) advocates subsidies and taxes on healthy and unhealthy foods respectively. One of the report’s major conclusions was

Photo: USDA, Flickr, creative commons licence 2.0
23 August 2016

A new strategy has been launched by the UK government to tackle overweight and obesity among children. The strategy highlights a reaffirmed commitment to the sugary drinks tax (the only measure in the strategy which is not based on voluntary action) and it emphasises the importance of sports and school breakfast clubs.

Photo: Livingasart, Buying Meat Two, Flickr, creative commons licence 2.0
16 August 2016

Energy intake has long been recognised as a factor in obesity, but more recently, interest has increased in whether some dietary patterns containing differing amounts of macronutrients and food groups, contribute more to body weight gain than do others.

20 April 2016

This column in Nature by Adam Briggs, public-health researcher at the University of Oxford, discusses the new UK sugar tax which the FCRN wrote about in our last newsletter.

1 April 2016

In this correspondence article in The Lancet researchers from Universities of Oxford and Cambridge analyse the conclusions of the Green budget report. The Green budget is an annual report published by the Institute of Fiscal Studies (IFS), ICAEW and the Nuffield foundation, which considers the issues and challenges facing the UK as its Government sets the country’s budget for the coming financial year.

3 February 2016

This BBC News – Health article describes the new smartphone app that has been released by Public Health England (PHE) as part of its Change4Life advertising campaign. The app allows the user to scan the bar-codes of over 75,000 food and drink items and be told how much sugar the item contains, either as sugar cubes or grams.

17 December 2015

In this blog-post, various archetypes or tropes of consumers are portrayed and scrutinized. General claims about consumer behaviour that pervade the discourse of food politics are discussed and three archetypes are identified. The author, Dr Ben Richardson from the Department of Politics and International Studies at University of Warwick, describes and questions both the figures of the food consumer being presented to us and the ideological projects with which they are associated.

17 December 2015

A new report by the Commons’ Health Committee discusses the potential of implementing a sugary drink tax as a way of combating child obesity. Sugary drinks are the largest sources of sugar for 11 to 18 year-olds and there is increasing concern over the effects of sugar on people’s health, particularly the health of children and teenagers.

9 November 2015

In June 2014, Public Health England (PHE) published ‘Sugar reduction: Responding to the challenge’. This set out what PHE would do to review the evidence across a broad range of areas and identify those where action is most likely to be effective in reducing sugar intakes. The findings from this review and the assessment of the evidence-based actions to reduce sugar consumption are set out in this report “Sugar reduction – the evidence for action”.

30 October 2015

In a joint project researchers from the University Halle-Wittenberg (Germany) looked at the direct medical treatment costs of nutrition-associated diseases related to the overconsumption of sugars, salt and saturated fatty acids. In all, the team identified 22 clinical endpoints with 48 risk-outcome pairs.

16 October 2015

Voters in Berkeley approved the first excise tax in the U.S. on sugar-sweetened beverages in 2014. This study analyses the effect it has had in its first year on retail prices.

Sales tax and excise duty tax are two different taxes that are levied by the government.  A sales tax is imposed at the point of sale. It is payable by the consumer, and is collected by the retailer who then passes it onto the state.

31 March 2015

The World Health Organisation has called on countries to reduced sugar intakes among their child and adult populations.  It recommends that people should obtain no more than 10% of their daily calories from free sugars, and cutting intakes to below 5% would provide additional benefits.