Knowledge for better food systems

Showing results for: Cassava

14 February 2014

Abstract

There is an urgent need to increase agricultural productivity in sub-Saharan Africa in a sustainable and economically-viable manner. Transforming risk-averse smallholders into business-oriented producers that invest in producing surplus food for sale provides a formidable challenge, both from a technological and socio-political perspective.

28 January 2014

The report Save and grow: Cassava is a 140 page guide for farmers and policy makers alike, showing how “Save and Grow” can help cassava growers avoid the risks of intensification, while realizing the crop’s potential for producing higher yields. This in turn, is described as a pathway for alleviating hunger and rural poverty, and contributing to national economic development. This is the first in a series of guides on the practical application of FAO’s ecosystem-based model of agriculture, which aims at improving productivity while conserving natural resources.

5 December 2013

The EU Gratitude project is aiming to reduce waste from post-harvest losses of root and tuber crops and turn unavoidable waste into something of value. It has yielded interesting findings on how waste from cassava and yams is managed in the value chains, findings which challenge the conventional idea that waste and losses in developing countries occur at the farm end of the value chain. In fact the results, presented at the mid-term review meeting, showed that in Ghana in particular waste and losses were greater at the consumer end and hence more costly- these patterns are more similar to those found in developed countries than previously believed.

24 June 2013

Cassava is a "survivor" crop, able to thrive in the expected higher temperatures caused by climate change. An alliance of scientists has recently been formed to help promote cassava cultivation. The 300 scientists attending the second International Scientific Conference of the Global Cassava Partnership for the 21st Century, held in Kampala Uganda presented a new initiative called Global Cassava Modelling Consortium. The Consortium aims to help researchers share information on this increasingly important crop, to better understand the physiology of the plant and to explore avenues for protecting it from attacks.