Showing results for: Fish oils/long chain fatty acids

Photo credit: Vincent-Lin, Fish, Flickr, Creative Commons License
8 February 2017

This systematic review considers how seafood is currently incorporated and assessed in the sustainable diets literature and examines the barriers to more adequate inclusion of seafood within research on sustainable diets. 

Photo: Flickr, 16:9 Clue, Creative Commons License 2.0
16 September 2016

Various health agencies recommend dietary intake of the two fatty acids omega-3 Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA) and Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) at a level between 250 and 500 mg/day.

3 February 2016

This ScienceDaily article describes how researchers at Wageningen University and Research Centre have shown that insect oils – currently extracted from insects alongside the desired edible proteins but discarded as a waste product – contain omega-3 fatty acids.

12 March 2014

This research shows that it is possible to modify plant seeds to produce omega 3 fatty acids. Through a process of  genetic modification,  the research modifies the plant Camelina sativa  (false flax) with genes from microalgae – the main producers of the omega 3 fatty acids DHA  and  EPA.  The oil extracted from the seeds can then be used as a more sustainable alternative to fish oils.

14 February 2014

This study (published in 2010) may be of interest. It looks at how the fat content and profile of poultry meat has changed over time.  Although poultry meat is often considered to be a ‘healthy’ low fat meat, the study finds that the fat content now exceeds the protein content.  Moreover, the composition of that fat has changed over time – due to changes in poultry diets, the Omega 3 content (ie. good fats that are also found in oily fish and that are often lacking in the diet) has declined relative to the more abundant Omega 6 fat.

6 February 2013

A study published in the journal Perspectives on Psychological Science reviews the Database on Raising Intelligence to find interventions that increased children’s intelligence. One such intervention involved supplementing infants with long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, and the study concludes that this does indeed have a positive impact on children’s IQ.