Showing results for: Geoengineering

Sorghum (Photo credit:  U.S. department of Agriculture, Flickr, creative commons)
10 March 2016

In this Nature Comment, Phil Williamson of the Natural England Research Council and the University of East Anglia, argues that in order for the climate goals agreed at the COP21 in Paris last year to be achieved, a full assessment must be made of the methods for removing carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere.

3 February 2016

This paper presents evidence that humans are undoubtedly altering many geological processes on Earth—and that we have been for some time. According to the international group of geoscientists the evidence is overwhelming that the impact of human activity on Earth has pushed us into a new geological era, a human-dominated time period, termed the “Anthropocene.”

18 February 2015

Two reports this week by the US National Research Council look at whether humans could artificially steer Earth's climate by reflecting sunlight back into space, or by taking carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere. The twin reports– Climate Intervention: Carbon Dioxide Removal and Reliable Sequestration and Climate Intervention: Reflecting Sunlight to Cool the Earth argue that carbon dioxide removal might have a place in a broader response plan, but sunlight-reflecting technologies are too risky.

15 October 2014

In this Carbon Brief blog Dr. Rob Bellamy presents an analysis of geoengineering, discussing available alternative options, different perspectives and the complexity of applying such solutions to the real world. In presenting the results of past studies he concludes that despite the addition of more options and perspectives, there is a remarkable consistency of arguments in geoengineering proposals and alternatives. 

Read the full article here.

Read more about geoengineering on our website.

14 February 2014

In this podcast video from The Centre for International Governance Innovation – CIGI, David Keith, Professor of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School, discusses the controversy, risks and potential benefits of climate geoengineering. Keith offers a background on solar geoengineering before addressing common criticisms. He notes that while solar geoengineering doesn't fit into current preconceptions about how we manage climate change, a moderate solar geoengineering solution could be a powerful tool in slowing the effects of climate change while dramatic emission reductions can continue. Tune in for the full discussion to learn more about this fascinating topic.

17 September 2013

The Living With Environmental Change (LWEC) Climate Mitigation Task Force has released a report which looks at where there might be a need for research activity on geoengineering. The report is a joint production between the Met Office Hadley Centre, University of East Anglia/Natural Environment Research Council and University of Exeter.