Knowledge for better food systems

‘Feeding the Planet: Building on the Milan Charter’ - Position statement by CIWF

Compassion In World Farming (CIWF) has produced a new report, Feeding the Planet: Building on the Milan Charter, released to coincide with the Expo Milan 2015 which is organised around the theme: Feeding The Planet, Energy for Life.

The Milan Charter – produced by Italy - highlights the need to produce healthy, safe and sufficient food for everyone, while respecting the planet and its equilibrium. 

This report from CIWF examines how these challenges can be met.  It argues that ‘business-as-usual’ is a disastrous approach to feeding the hungry and malnourished and that it will continue to fuel diet-related ill-health. Further, CIWF argues that a ‘business-as-usual’ approach will fail to tackle problems of degrading land and soils, water pollution and eroding biodiversity.  They argue that the current focus on industrialisation also risks driving animal welfare to new lows.

CIWF suggests that we need to develop a new food system that abandons factory farming and instead focuses on producing healthy food of high nutritional quality and in helping small-scale farmers in the developing world to build better livelihoods.  It argues that animals should be reared to high welfare standards on extensive pastures and in rotational integrated crop-livestock systems and finally - that we should farm in ways that restore natural resources otherwise future generations will struggle to feed themselves.

You can read more and download the full report here.

See more information related to livestock and livestock systems  as well as intensification in our research library. See also some of our recent discussions on animal welfare here and here.

You can read related research by browsing the following categories of our research library:
 

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While some of the food system challenges facing humanity are local, in an interconnected world, adopting a global perspective is essential. Many environmental issues, such as climate change, need supranational commitments and action to be addressed effectively. Due to ever increasing global trade flows, prices of commodities are connected through space; a drought in Romania may thus increase the price of wheat in Zimbabwe.

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