Knowledge for better food systems

2012 Global Hunger Index released

The 2012 Global Hunger Index (GHI) report—the seventh in an annual series prepared by the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)—presents a multidimensional measure of global, regional, and national hunger.

The 2012 Global Hunger Index (GHI) report—the seventh in an annual series prepared by the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)—presents a multidimensional measure of global, regional, and national hunger.

Less optimistic than the FAO’s State of Food Insecurity report, it finds that progress in reducing the proportion of hungry people in the world has been tragically slow. According to the index, hunger on a global scale remains “serious.” Twenty countries have levels of hunger that are “alarming” or “extremely alarming.” This year’s GHI reflects data from 2005-2010—the most recent country-level data available on the three GHI measures.

The 2012 GHI is calculated for 120 developing countries and countries in transition for which data on the three indicators of hunger are available. The GHI combines three equally weighted indicators into one score: the proportion of people who are undernourished, the proportion of children under five who are underweight, and the mortality rate of children younger than age five.

The 2012 GHI report focuses particularly on how to ensure sustainable food security under conditions of land, water, and energy stress.

The citation is as follows:
von Grebmer, K., Ringler, C., Rosegrant, M. W., Olofinbiyi, T., Wiesmann, D., Fritschel, H., Badiane, O.,…Rahall, J. (2012). 2012 Global Hunger Index. Welthungerhilfe/International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)/Concern Worldwide.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2499/9780896299429

To download the report, click here.

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While some of the food system challenges facing humanity are local, in an interconnected world, adopting a global perspective is essential. Many environmental issues, such as climate change, need supranational commitments and action to be addressed effectively. Due to ever increasing global trade flows, prices of commodities are connected through space; a drought in Romania may thus increase the price of wheat in Zimbabwe.

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