Knowledge for better food systems

Book: Food Policy and the Environmental Credit Crunch: From Soup to Nuts

This book discusses the implications of the financial credit crunch for consumers and food spending. The authors argue that the credit crunch is having an impact not only on short term food prices but also on the sustainability of the food system.  The economic changes we experience now are said to have a bearing on our ability to manage the environmental credit crunch that looms. The authors conclude that a significant and positive difference could be made by changing some of the ways in which we procure, prepare, and consume our food.

This book discusses the implications of the financial credit crunch for consumers and food spending. The authors argue that the credit crunch is having an impact not only on short term food prices but also on the sustainability of the food system.  The economic changes we experience now are said to have a bearing on our ability to manage the environmental credit crunch that looms. The authors conclude that a significant and positive difference could be made by changing some of the ways in which we procure, prepare, and consume our food.

Written by an economist (Julie Hudson) and an investment professional (Paul Donovan), this book addresses the economic and environmental implications of how we treat food. It examines each aspect of the food chain, from agriculture, to production and processing, retail, preparation, consumption and waste.

Overview of content

1. Overview: The Great Food Crunch

2. Raw Material Inputs: Mineral

3. Raw Material Inputs: Vegetable

4. Raw Material Inputs: Animal

5. Food Processing

6. Transport

7. Food Wholesaling and Retailing

8. Eating Food

9. Human Health and Food

10. Food Waste

11. Conclusion

Citation

J. Hudson, P. Donovan , 2013, Food Policy and the Environmental Credit Crunch: From Soup to Nuts, Ruthledge.

Read more and order on the Routhledge website, you can also order it as an e-book, click the links and Find on Amazon Kindle, Find on Apple iBookStore.

You can read related research by browsing the following categories of our research library:
 

Add comment

Member input

Plain text

CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.

Region

Region: 

Global

While some of the food system challenges facing humanity are local, in an interconnected world, adopting a global perspective is essential. Many environmental issues, such as climate change, need supranational commitments and action to be addressed effectively. Due to ever increasing global trade flows, prices of commodities are connected through space; a drought in Romania may thus increase the price of wheat in Zimbabwe.

View global articles

Source

Doc Type