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Brexit and agricultural law

This forthcoming book by Ludivine Petetin and Mary Dobbs analyses how British agricultural law might change following the UK’s exit from the European Union.

Publisher’s summary

Brexit is shaking the foundations of UK agriculture to the core. The EU market, laws and policies, including the Common Agricultural Policy, shaped the evolution of UK agriculture for decades. Brexit creates a partial vacuum that simultaneously poses considerable opportunities and challenges for the UK; it raises fundamental questions regarding whether to have a centralised or devolved approach, what objectives and standards to strive for, what markets to target, what is permissible or feasible and, crucially, how the law will stand post Brexit. National politics, the future relationship with the EU, international (trade) law, food safety and quality, sustainable agriculture and environmental protection are only some of the relevant considerations. This book addresses these questions and analyses the UK government’s attempts to address the uncertainties through the Agriculture Bill. It outlines the potential for a Domestic Agricultural Policy embracing agri-sustainability and how this new policy might be shaped to achieve a more sustainable food future.

 

Reference

Petetin, L. and Dobbs, M., 2019. Brexit and Agricultural Law. Taylor & Francis, Abingdon.

For more details, see here. See also the Foodsource resource How does food interface with societal and health concerns?

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Europe

Europe is the world's second-smallest continent by surface area, covering just over 10 million square kilometres or 6.8% of the global land area, but it is the third-most populous continent after Asia and Africa, with a population of around 740 million people or about 11% of the world's population. Its climate is heavily affected by warm Atlantic currents that temper winters and summers on much of the continent. In the European Union, farmers represent only 4.7% of the working population, yet manage nearly half of its land area.

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