Knowledge for better food systems

Showing results for: Report

17 January 2011

This paper summarises the presentations and discussions that took place at a workshop organised by the Food Climate Research Network on 21 January 2010. 

17 January 2011

The Food Climate Research Network and WWF-UK have published a new report – How Low Can We Go? An assessment of greenhouse gas emissions from the UK food system and the scope for reduction by 2050 – that quantifies the UK’s food carbon footprint - taking into account emissions from land use change - and explores a range of scenarios for achieving a 70% cut in food related greenhouse gas emissions.

17 January 2011

This paper considers what we know about the contribution that the fruit and vegetable sector makes to the UK's greenhouse gas emissions. It also looks at what we know about the options for achieving emissions reductions.

17 January 2011

This paper looks at the alcohol we consume here in the UK. It considers whether we can quantify in ‘good enough’ terms the contribution that our alcohol consumption makes to the UK’s total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. 

17 January 2011

This paper explores the contribution that our consumption of livestock products in the UK makes to greenhouse gases, the complexities associated with attempts at quantifying these impacts, the options for mitigation and the environmental and welfare challenges these options may present.

17 January 2011

This paper looks at what this means in terms of refrigeration’s contribution to UK greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, at how this reliance on refrigeration has come about and what the consequences might be as regards future trends and associated emissions. It looks at how we might be able to reduce greenhouse gas emissions associated with food refrigeration both by improving the greenhouse gas efficiency of the equipment itself and, as a culture, by reducing our dependence on the cold chain.

17 January 2011

This FCRN report sets out what we know about the food system’s contribution to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.

3 July 2010

The Committee on Climate Change has published its second progress report to Parliament. It says that a step change in the pace of underlying emissions reductions is still required if the UK is to meet its legislated carbon budgets - which require at least a 34% cut in emissions by 2020 relative to 1990 levels. Emissions of greenhouse gases have declined over the past year (by 8.6%), but this is almost entirely due to a reduction in economic activity caused by the recession and increased fossil fuel/ energy prices, and is not the result of the implementation of measures to reduce emissions.

21 May 2010

In November 2009 Japan's Ministry of the Environment released an Annual Report on the Environment, the Sound Material-Cycle Society and the Biodiversity in Japan 2009, Abridged and Illustrated for Easy Understanding.

4 November 2009

In November 2009 the World Watch Institute released a report arguing that the FAO's estimate of livestock's total contribution to global GHG emissions (18%) is a serious underestimate and that the true footprint of livestock production is around 51% higher.

28 October 2009

A study published in September 2008 finds that organic agriculture in Africa can be equal or better for food security than most conventional systems and is more likely to be sustainable in the longer term, as it builds up levels of natural, human, social, financial and physical capital in farming communities. It also favours the use of low carbon footprint production methods and local resources.

14 August 2009

The Food Standards Agency has published a systematic review which it commissioned which sought to determine the size and relevance to health of any differences in content of nutrients and other substances in organically and conventionally produced crops and livestock products. The focus of the review was the nutritional content of foodstuffs. 

6 February 2009

This report shows, through analysis and a wide variety of case studies, that urban agriculture can, in a very practical way, yield a range of benefits.

6 February 2009

This report builds upon the Growing food in cities report. Whereas the emphasis of Growing food in cities was very much on the potential benefits of urban agriculture, this report focuses on what the actual benefits have been, and on the feasibility of developing food growing activities further, given London's specific social, economic and environmental context.

6 February 2009

In November 2008 the Greater London Authority published a report on London's food related greenhouse gas emissions.

9 January 2009

Shortly before Christmas 2008, the Bristol research unit FRPERC produced this short briefing note looking at the energy requirements to produce a typical roast dinner, plus various lower-energy options.

Keywords:
4 June 2008

In May 2008, WRAP published a report saying that the cost of needlessly wasted food to UK households is £10 billion a year, £2 billion higher than previously estimated. The report finds that we throw away 6.7 million tonnes of food each year, when most of this food could have been eaten. It says that stopping the waste of good food could avoid 18 million tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalents from being emitted each year - the same as taking 1 in 5 cars off of UK roads (NB - unless, one might add, we decide to spend the money saved on new i-pods or shoes).

Pages