Knowledge for better food systems

FAO on new milk and dairy species in human nutrition

Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) has published a new book focusing on the role of dairy products in improving nutrition in developing countries.

Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) has published a new book focusing on the role of dairy products in improving nutrition in developing countries.        

The book looks at milk sources beyond the cow such as buffalo, goat, sheep, reindeer, moose, llama, alpaca, donkey, yak, camel and mithun, arguing that there is great potential for developing these other dairy species. They are particularly positive about the potential for building goat dairy production, since goatkeeping can more easily be taken up by rural poor families.

The key recommendations are geared towards governments who are urged  to do more to subsidise dairy products but also make such products more easily available and to make it easier for smallholders to home-produce.

For more information and to download the book see here. You can also read an article on the Dairyreporter.com here.

There will be an online event hosted in relation to this book launch on Healthy & Functional Dairy, December 12 see here for more information.

You can find more resources on milk and dairy in our research library here. And for more on nutrition in developing country contexts see here.

You can read related research by browsing the following categories of our research library:
 

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