Knowledge for better food systems

Food as a human right

This book, by William D. Schanbacher, addresses ethical issues around access to food, outlines how the global food system works, and offers suggestions on how people can engage their communities and learn more about the foods they eat.

Publisher’s summary

This important work addresses the difficult ethical issues surrounding the accessibility of food to all people as a human right, and not a privilege that emerges because of social structure or benefit of geography.

Food sovereignty—the right of peoples to define their own chosen food and agriculture, free of monopolization or threats—is the path to stopping global hunger. This book approaches the topic from a solutions-based perspective, discussing concrete policy providing for sovereignty, or control, of one's own food sources as a solution that, while controversial, offers more promise than do the actions of international organizations and trade agreements. Providing access to safe, healthy food is an ethical responsibility of the world's nations, not just a right of the elite or wealthy.

This book presses the need to formulate policies that address the problems of poverty and hunger on a more humane and meaningful level. Organized thematically, chapters are based on such topics as food security, food sovereignty, human rights, and sustainability that focus on the global food system. Specific case studies provide examples of global hunger and poverty issues. Taken in its entirety, the book informs readers of how their food consumption might negatively affect the global poor, while its concluding chapters offer solutions for alleviating problems in the global food system.

 

Reference

Schanbacher, W. D., 2019. Food as a Human Right: Combatting Global Hunger and Forging a Path to Food Sovereignty. ABC-CLIO, Santa Barbara.

Read more here. See also the Foodsource building block What is food security?

You can read related research by browsing the following categories of our research library:
 

Add comment

Member input

Plain text

CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.

Region

Region: 

Global

While some of the food system challenges facing humanity are local, in an interconnected world, adopting a global perspective is essential. Many environmental issues, such as climate change, need supranational commitments and action to be addressed effectively. Due to ever increasing global trade flows, prices of commodities are connected through space; a drought in Romania may thus increase the price of wheat in Zimbabwe.

View global articles

Source

Doc Type