Knowledge for better food systems

Showing results for: Dairy and alternatives

A dairy product is food derived from the milk of mammals. The main animals used for milk production are most often cows, but in some countries goats, sheep, water buffaloes, yaks, horses and camels are also used. While dairy is used regularly Europe, the Middle East, South and Central Asia, East Asian and Southeast Asian cuisines avoids it. Dairy products include butter, cream and fermented milk products such as cheese, yogurt, kefir. Dairy contains significant amounts of cholesterol and saturated fat, although with the exception of butter. Non-animal alternatives to standard dairy products may be made from soya, rice, oats, almond and coconut. Dairy production is resource-and GHG-intensive (dairy producing animals are ruminants) and give rise to the same environmental concerns that are associated with meat consumption.

Image: US Department of Agriculture, k11662-1, Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic
6 February 2018

Tougher immigration laws, the rising cost of labour and cheap credit could encourage dairy farms to use more robots, according to this article in Bloomberg.

Image: David J, Oats, Flickr, Creative Commons license 2.0 generic.
1 February 2018

In more non-dairy milk news, oat milk maker Oatly are marketing their product to coffee shops across the United States.

Image: USDA, 20150722-NRCS-LSC-0122, Flickr, Creative Commons Public Domain Mark 1.0
1 February 2018

The rising popularity of non-dairy milks has prompted calls from the dairy industry for the name “milk” to be restricted to the dairy version.

21 January 2018

Researcher at the University of Nottingham have developed a free Excel-based tool to reduce the use of antibiotics on dairy farms. It is hoped this will help combat antimicrobial resistance in the farming industry. The calculator gives measurements which graphically display to farmers their use of antibiotics and detects any patterns. The calculator also tells farmers how their antibiotic use compares to other farms.

28 November 2017

The top five mega-corporations responsible for factory-farmed meat and dairy are responsible for emitting more combined greenhouse gases (GHGs) than Exxon, or Shell, or BP. That is according to findings released in a joint study undertaken by IATP and GRAIN.

7 June 2017

An ad used by Arla Foods to promote their organic milk has been banned as it used the "misleading" claim that its production is "good for the land". 

Photo: Erik Edgren, taro burger, Flickr, Creative Commons License 2.0 generic.
12 April 2017

In this paper, using three scenarios for food demand, the researchers model and highlight the indirect relationship between greenhouse gas (GHG) emission abatement within the food supply system and the energy system, globally.

7 March 2017

As Asda becomes the first UK retailer to sell ‘free range’ milk, the Pasture Promise logo will be placed on the milk packages, to ensure consumers that the cows grazed for 180 days and nights and farmers were offered fair price.

8 February 2017

This report outlines the main - familiar - arguments for cutting meat and dairy consumption in high-income countries in order to significantly reduce GHG emissions. It specifically focuses on larger corporations and briefly touches on governance issues.

3 November 2016

With milk prices in the USA dropping due in part to a fall in demand from Chinese middle class customers, large stockpiles of cheese now lie waiting.

Photo: Peter O’Connor, Cattle Herd, Flickr, Creative Commons License 2.0
31 August 2016

This report commissioned by the Committee on World Food Security (CFS) and written by its High Level Panel of Experts for Food Security and Nutrition (HLPE) focuses on sustainable agricultural development for food security and nutrition, specifically in relation to livestock.

1 April 2016

The EU parliament has now approved a law which will merge the separate EU school milk and fruit schemes and boost their combined annual budget from €20m to €250m a year.

18 January 2016

This paper published in Marketing Science finds that small price differences at the point of purchase (a so-called excise tax) can be highly effective in shifting consumer demand from high calorie to healthier low calorie alternatives.

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