Knowledge for better food systems

Fungi bio-prospects in sustainable agriculture

This book looks at how fungi can be used in sustainable agriculture, for example as a fertiliser, for management of drought and as a growth promoter.

Publisher’s summary

Fungi bio-prospects in sustainable agriculture, environment and nanotechnology is a three-volume series that has been designed to explore the huge potential of the many diverse applications of fungi to human life. The series unveils the latest developments and scientific advances in the study of the biodiversity of fungi, extremophilic fungi, and fungal secondary metabolites and enzymes, while also presenting cutting-edge molecular tools used to study fungi. Readers will learn all about the recent progress and future potential applications of fungi in agriculture, environmental remediation, industry, food safety, medicine, and nanotechnology.

Volume 1 will cover the biodiversity of fungi and the associated biopotential applications. This volume offers insights into both basic and advanced biotechnological applications in human welfare and sustainable agriculture. The chapters shed light on the different roles of fungi as a bio-fertiliser, a bio-control agent, and a component of microbial inoculants. They also focus on the various applications of fungi in bio-fuel production, nano-technology, and in the management of abiotic stresses such as drought, salinity, and metal toxicity.

 

Reference

Sharma, V. K., Shah, M. P., Parmar, S. and Kumar, A. (2020). Fungi Bio-prospects in Sustainable Agriculture, Environment and Nano-technology, Volume 1: Fungal Diversity of Sustainable Agriculture. Elsevier, Amsterdam.

Read more here. See also the Foodsource resource How far could changes in production practices reduce GHG emissions?

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While some of the food system challenges facing humanity are local, in an interconnected world, adopting a global perspective is essential. Many environmental issues, such as climate change, need supranational commitments and action to be addressed effectively. Due to ever increasing global trade flows, prices of commodities are connected through space; a drought in Romania may thus increase the price of wheat in Zimbabwe.

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