Knowledge for better food systems

Growth in Californian air freight expected

The Role of Air Cargo in California's Agricultural Export Trade: A 2007 Update, published by the Center for Agricultural Business (CAB) analyses international air cargo transport trends and outlines several reasons to expect growth in California airborne agricultural exports.
The Role of Air Cargo in California's Agricultural Export Trade: A 2007 Update, published by the Center for Agricultural Business (CAB) analyses international air cargo transport trends and outlines several reasons to expect growth in California airborne agricultural exports. At the same time, authors of the report caution that rising fuel costs and world terrorism have the potential to ground some export flights. California airborne food export trade was 24.5% higher in 2006 than it had been 10 years earlier, despite recent declines. In 2006 for example, 77.6 percent of California's $60 million in fresh cherry exports traveled by air. Seeds for growing fruits, vegetables and flowers ranked at the top of the value list, with air exports totaling $114.3 million. Other important airborne exports in 2006 included wine (valued at $21.8 million), various food preparations ($41.6 million), purebred breeding animals ($38.3 million), and bovine semen ($18.5 million). The principal destinations of California's airborne agricultural export trade are in the Far East, with Japan ranking as the single largest market over the last three years, the authors found. South Korea, China, and Taiwan are all currently number among the top ten overseas markets. The second and third largest customers are the United Kingdom and Australia. A more limited airborne agricultural export trade is conducted with Continental Europe and Latin America.
 

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