Knowledge for better food systems

Showing results for: Issues

Food is a nodal point for multiple interconnected issues and concerns. The categories below highlight a few of the most critical, including food security and nutrition, water, governance and policy, and health issues.

2 May 2014

This report identifies how agriculture contributes to global climate change and seeks to dissolve the false dichotomy between achieving food security or environmental health.

2 May 2014

This study models two policies for increasing cattle ranching productivity in Brazil in order to analyse whether intensification of pasture-based cattle ranching would allow for rainforest protection and further enable Brazil to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions and improve agricultural productivity.

2 May 2014

Despite a focus on reducing fossil fuel consumption, cuts in these emissions by themselves will not sufficiently address climate change.

25 April 2014

Representatives from 27 Swedish food companies and organisations, have entered into a voluntary agreement to make sure that soy used in the production of food sold in Sweden is produced in a socially and environmentally responsible manner.

25 April 2014

In this interview journalist Tom Levitt discusses with Barry Popkin, coordinator of the China Health and Nutrition Survey, how Chinese diets have shifted in recent years and what this means in terms of public health and environmental impacts.

25 April 2014

This report quantifies how much our food choices affect pollutant nitrogen emissions, climate change and land use across Europe.

25 April 2014

Abstract
On 20 February 2014 the British Academy and ESRC co-hosted an interactive scoping workshop designed to discuss novel ideas and fresh approaches to the issue of building an economy that fosters sustainable prosperity.

25 April 2014

Given the impending expiration of the MDGs, this article’s timely revision of the means of assessing extreme global poverty demonstrates how “dollar a day” measurements (now adjusted to $1.25) lack anchorage in specific human requirements, failing to provide a multidimensional understanding of poverty.

25 April 2014

Africa has been thought to be a potentially large carbon sink of great value in efforts to mitigate carbon dioxide emissions. But this study reveals that it could be a net source of greenhouse gases that will increase global warming.

25 April 2014

Diets with a greater dairy and meat proportion lead to more emissions, as compared to those with more vegetables and fruits.

21 April 2014

We are pleased to announce a new FCRN discussion paper which considers the increasingly topical question of: ‘What is a sustainable healthy diet?’ 

15 April 2014

The ODI report 'Future Diets' traces how the changes in diet - more fat, more meat, more sugar and bigger portions - have led to a looming global health crisis. 

10 April 2014

Since this is a complex but very interesting paper, we’ve put together a more detailed summary and explanation of the paper’s approach and findings, together with some comments in this document here.  Our summary and commentary draws upon some very helpful insights from Professor Pete Smith at the University of Aberdeen and includes some useful commentary from Dr Marco Springmann at the University of Oxford – thanks to both.

9 April 2014

The Countryside and Community Research Institute (CCRI) at the University of Gloucestershire has received EU funding for a 5-year project which will be looking at measures to prevent and remediate soil degradation in Europe.

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9 April 2014

Two reports by the UN's Food and Agricultural Organisation on malnutrition and on food waste. 

9 April 2014

This open access article from Chalmers University, Sweden, argues that unless we reduce our consumption of meat and dairy, world temperatures will continue to rise and we will be unable to meet the goal of keeping global temperatures from rising more than 2˚C.

9 April 2014

This very interesting paper essentially argues that policies designed to incentivise production efficiencies achieve greater GHG reductions than those focusing on consumption. Moreover they do so at lower calorie ‘cost’ than consumption side measures. The abstract is given below, but we’ve produced some further explanation of the paper’s approach and findings, together with some comments in Our summary and commentary (which you can also download as a PDF below) draws upon some very helpful insights from Professor Pete Smith at the University of Aberdeen and includes some useful commentary from Dr Marco Springmann at the University of Oxford – thanks to both.

9 April 2014

A senatorial report in France is now pushing for the implementation of a fast food or ‘behavioural’ tax. The tax would target products linked to heart disease, focusing in particular on soft drinks. The report 'Taxation and public health: evaluation of behavioural taxation' argues that a behavioural tax would help combat the surge in diet related diseases and associated costs.

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