Knowledge for better food systems

Showing results for: Standards/certification

5 December 2013

The EU Gratitude project is aiming to reduce waste from post-harvest losses of root and tuber crops and turn unavoidable waste into something of value. It has yielded interesting findings on how waste from cassava and yams is managed in the value chains, findings which challenge the conventional idea that waste and losses in developing countries occur at the farm end of the value chain. In fact the results, presented at the mid-term review meeting, showed that in Ghana in particular waste and losses were greater at the consumer end and hence more costly- these patterns are more similar to those found in developed countries than previously believed.

21 November 2013

Catapult, an organisation working to end trade in products linked to deforestation, praise the pledges made by Unilever and Ferrero to strengthen commitments to sustainable palm oil, going beyond the RSPO (Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil) standards. Both companies are thus coming closer to the goal of sourcing only fully traceable, certified and sustainable palm oil.

13 November 2013

IGD has released this guide to help buyers and planners to prepare for scenarios of uncertain future food supplies. It tries to provide companies with help to identify risks, anticipate and prepare for possible disruptions to their supply routes and maintain deliveries to consumers. It includes information on 19 food security issues explained from a company viewpoint and recommendations on how to manage risk and keep down costs. The chapters focus on issues such as global consumption, food waste, food affordability, climate change, land use and soil degradation.

13 November 2013

This report updates WRAP’s 2007 report The Food We Waste which exposed the full scale of the food waste problem for the first time. It identifies how much food is wasted in UK homes, which foods are wasted most and why, and how much that waste costs. The WRAP research reveals a substantial reduction in the amount of household food and drink waste arising between 2007 and 2012, while also highlighting the scale of the opportunity remaining.

1 November 2013

As the FCRN has previously reported, the EU commission recently held a consultation (now closed) aimed at exploring how we as a society might move towards a more resource efficient and sustainable food system. The public consultation included discussions on a number of areas for action:

1 November 2013

This paper published  in Journal of Environmental Planning and Management discusses the idea of  using surplus food redistribution to reduce food waste. It concludes that unless a distinction is drawn between genuine waste to be recovered and surplus to be redistributed for community benefit, surplus food as a resource is unlikely to be fully utilised.

15 October 2013

This paper explores how far changes in consumers’ diets can lead to reductions in food related GHG emissions. While previous studies have looked at the relative mitigation impact of switching to vegetarian and vegan diets, this paper estimates the contribution that the average UK diet makes to GHG emissions. It does so by combining the GHG emissions from 66 different food categories with self-reported dietary information. The average GHG impact that the authors arrive at is 8.8 kg CO2 eq per person – including both food eaten and the embedded emissions in food wasted (post-purchase).

7 October 2013

This report from Global Food Security programme (GFS) entitled ‘Food waste within global food systems’ discusses how reduction of losses and waste throughout the entire food system can contribute to achieving global food security. It provides an independent assessment of the issues around food waste in developing and developed countries and suggests a number of potential future research priorities across the food supply chain.

17 September 2013

Approximately one-third of all food produced for human consumption in the world is lost or wasted.  This FAO report argues that this waste represents a missed opportunity to improve global food security, and to mitigate the environmental impacts resulting from the food supply chain.

17 September 2013

This paper addresses the following key question: How much land-based greenhouse gas mitigation can be achieved without compromising food security and environmental goals?

Taking the AFOLU sector (Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use), the paper starts by distinguishing and quantifying the range of options for action on the a. supply-side (improved management of biomass, soils, livestock, and energy use in agriculture and forestry) and b. the demand-side (reducing food waste, limiting over-consumption, and shifting to less resource-intense diets) before considering some of the trade offs and interactions among the different options.

17 September 2013

This paper is the outcome of the Global Food Security Programme’s six-month project to identify priority research questions for the UK food system. It details the rationale, process and outcomes of Global Food Security project.

The identified priority research questions are aimed at improving the UK food system’s efficiency and effectiveness and complement other studies that have been framed from a more productionist viewpoint. The authors also try to adopt a wider understanding of “food security” – one that incorporates nutritional content, food safety, preferences and affordability in addition to availability of supply.

5 September 2013

This publication by FAO examines how fruit and vegetable wastes (FVW) could be used as livestock feed. The demand for livestock products is rapidly increasing in most developing countries but in many cases there are severe feed deficits. The sustainability of feed production systems is being challenged due to biophysical factors such as land, soil and water scarcity, food-fuel-feed competition, ongoing global warming and frequent and drastic weather events, along with increased competition for arable land and non-renewable resources such as fossil carbon-sources, water and phosphorus.

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