Knowledge for better food systems

Preventing food losses and waste for food security

This book addresses food loss and waste from a range of perspectives, looking at key stages in the supply chain, different types of commodity and different regions in the world.

Publisher’s summary

This book provides a comprehensive review of the causes and prevention of food losses and waste (FLW) at key steps in the supply chain.

The book begins by defining what is meant by food losses and waste and then assessing current research on its economic, environmental and nutritional impact. It then reviews what we know about causes and prevention of FLW at different stages in the supply chain, from cultivation, harvesting and storage, through processing and distribution to retail and consumer use. The third part of the book looks at FLW for particular commodities, including cereals and grains, fresh fruit and vegetables, roots and tubers, oilseeds and tubers, meat and dairy products, and fish and seafood products. The final section in the book reviews the effectiveness of campaigns to reduce FLW in regions such as North and Latin America, Asia and the Pacific, the Middle East and, sub-Saharan Africa. 

 

Reference

Yahia, E. M. (ed.) (2020). Preventing food losses and waste to achieve food security and sustainability. Burleigh Dodds Science Publishing, Swaston.

Read more here. See also the Foodsource building block What is food loss and food waste?

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Global

While some of the food system challenges facing humanity are local, in an interconnected world, adopting a global perspective is essential. Many environmental issues, such as climate change, need supranational commitments and action to be addressed effectively. Due to ever increasing global trade flows, prices of commodities are connected through space; a drought in Romania may thus increase the price of wheat in Zimbabwe.

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