Knowledge for better food systems

The way we eat now

This book by Bee Wilson explores how changing diets affect health, social interactions and the wider world.

Publisher’s summary

An award-winning food writer takes us on a global tour of what the world eats–and shows us how we can change it for the better.

Food is one of life’s great joys. So why has eating become such a source of anxiety and confusion?

Bee Wilson shows that in two generations the world has undergone a massive shift from traditional, limited diets to more globalized ways of eating, from bubble tea to quinoa, from Soylent to meal kits.

Paradoxically, our diets are getting healthier and less healthy at the same time. For some, there has never been a happier food era than today: a time of unusual herbs, farmers’ markets, and internet recipe swaps. Yet modern food also kills–diabetes and heart disease are on the rise everywhere on earth.

This is a book about the good, the terrible, and the avocado toast. A riveting exploration of the hidden forces behind what we eat, The Way We Eat Now explains how this food revolution has transformed our bodies, our social lives, and the world we live in.

 

Reference

Wilson, B. (2019). The Way We Eat Now: How the Food Revolution Has Transformed Our Lives, Our Bodies, and Our World. Basic Books, New York.

Read more here. See also the Foodsource building block What is the nutrition transition?

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While some of the food system challenges facing humanity are local, in an interconnected world, adopting a global perspective is essential. Many environmental issues, such as climate change, need supranational commitments and action to be addressed effectively. Due to ever increasing global trade flows, prices of commodities are connected through space; a drought in Romania may thus increase the price of wheat in Zimbabwe.

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