Knowledge for better food systems

Showing results for: Political economy

12 December 2017

This new book, edited by Michel. P. Pimbert, Director at the Center for Agroecology, Water and Resilience in the U.K., critically examines the kinds of knowledge and ways of knowing needed for food sovereignty, agroecology and biocultural diversity.

28 November 2017

This new book, edited by Laura M. Pereira, Caitlin A. McElroy, Alexandra Littaye and Alexandra M. Girard, presents a diversity of collaborations between various governance actors in the management of the Food-Energy-Water (FEW) nexus and analyses the ability of emergent governance structures to cope with the complexity of future challenges across FEW systems worldwide.

28 November 2017

Where in the world is the most expensive plate of food? In this publication the World Food Programme calculates the relative price of a nutritious meal in countries around the globe when compared to the average daily income and finds that the world’s poorest would have to pay more than a day’s wages for a single plate of sufficient food.

28 November 2017

This report, authored by the International Panel of Experts on Sustainable Food Systems (IPES-Food) and commissioned by the Global Alliance for the Future of Food, shows how food systems affect health through multiple, interconnected pathways, generating severe human and economic costs – and points to levers that can help to address the critical health issues and compounding factors that contribute to poor health, such as climate change, poverty and inequality, and unsanitary conditions.

14 November 2017

This new book explores the current resistance to the corporate neoliberal agri-food regime. It theorizes and empirically assesses the strengths, limits and contradictions that characterize different forms of established and emerging resistance movements.

30 October 2017

The University of Cambridge Conservation Research Institute have set up a blog to provide space for a conversation about the future of the British countryside.

30 September 2017

This book, edited by Annette Aurelie Desmarais, Priscilla Claeys and Amy Trauger, examines various social movements around food.

12 September 2017

This book by Nick Silver provides an in-depth critique of the current financial system.

13 July 2017

This is a new book by Pingali and Feder on agriculture in the face of rural transformations across the world. A textbook which looks at agriculture and rural development from a variety of angles, it focuses mostly on the developing world. 

13 July 2017

The Food Citizenship report is the result of a ten month inquiry led by the New Citizenship Project with the Food Ethics Council, working with six organisations across the food system to explore a future ‘Citizen’ food system. It explores what could happen if the key players in the food system switched from a consumer to a citizen mindset, generating ideas and testing new approaches to food citizenship.

Photo: United Soybean Board, "Corn field", Flickr, Creative Commons License 2.0 generic.
21 June 2017

This article examines how big food companies contend with some of the issues involved in efforts to improve the sustainability of their raw material supply chains. It argues that these large companies often operate in long, complex, and traditionally non-transparent supply chains that make it difficult for them to exert real influence over producers. ‘Big food’ is the description given to the world’s largest and most influential companies in the food and beverages markets.

Photo: harmishhk, "éolienne", Flickr, Creative Commons License 2.0 generic.
21 June 2017

This study presents estimates of how changes in climate might affect the value of European farmland. Based on data for over 41 000 farms, the results suggest that their economic value could drop by up to 32%, depending on the climate scenario considered. The models represent severe, moderate and mild outcomes, respectively.  Farms in southern Europe are particularly sensitive to climate change and could suffer value losses of up to 9% per 1 °C rise.

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