Knowledge for better food systems

Biopesticides for sustainable agriculture

This book reviews research on the development of biopesticides, including those based on microbes, natural substances and pheromones.

Publisher’s summary

With increasing concern about the environmental impact of synthetic pesticide use, including their impact on beneficial insects, the problem of insect resistance and the lack of new products, there has been increasing interest in developing alternative biopesticides to control insect and other pests. This collection reviews the wealth of research on identifying, developing, assessing and improving the growing range of biopesticides.

Part 1 of this collection reviews research on developing new biopesticides in such areas as screening new compounds, ways of assessing effectiveness in the field and improving regulatory approval processes. Part 2 summarises advances in different types of entomopathogenic biopesticide including entomopathogenic fungi and nematodes and the use Bt genes in insect-resistant crops. Part 3 assesses the use of semiochemicals such as pheromones and allelochemicals, peptide-based and other natural substance-based biopesticides. 

 

Reference

Birch, N. and Glare, T. (eds.) (2020). Biopesticides for sustainable agriculture. Burleigh Dodds Science Publishing, Swaston.

Read more here. See also the Foodsource resource How do food systems contribute to water pollution?

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While some of the food system challenges facing humanity are local, in an interconnected world, adopting a global perspective is essential. Many environmental issues, such as climate change, need supranational commitments and action to be addressed effectively. Due to ever increasing global trade flows, prices of commodities are connected through space; a drought in Romania may thus increase the price of wheat in Zimbabwe.

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