Knowledge for better food systems

Food safety & quality systems in developing countries

This book provides technical information on food safety and quality in developing countries, using case studies of various types of food including spices, cassava, fruits and vegetables and beverages.

Publisher’s summary

Food Safety and Quality Systems in Developing Countries: Volume III: Technical and Market Considerations is a practical resource for companies seeking to supply food products from developing countries to developed country markets or to transnational business located in developing countries. It explores practical approaches to complying with food safety and quality systems requirements, backed by the science-based approaches used in the major markets applied in a developing country context. It explores the topic from the perspective of agribusiness value chains and includes deconstructions of regulatory and market channel-specific technical requirements in North America, Europe, and other major markets. Volume III builds on the platforms laid by the previous two volumes, providing guidance from industry-leading experts on addressing regulatory and market-specific microbiological, chemical, packaging and labelling, supply chain, and systems-related food safety and quality compliance requirements.

This book addresses technical and market-determined standards that value chain participants in developing countries face supplying developed country markets or transnational firms, including hotels, major multiples, and quick serve restaurant brands.

 

Reference

Gordon, A. (ed.)(2020). Food Safety and Quality Systems in Developing Countries: Volume III: Technical and Market Considerations. Academic Press, Cambridge.

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While some of the food system challenges facing humanity are local, in an interconnected world, adopting a global perspective is essential. Many environmental issues, such as climate change, need supranational commitments and action to be addressed effectively. Due to ever increasing global trade flows, prices of commodities are connected through space; a drought in Romania may thus increase the price of wheat in Zimbabwe.

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