Knowledge for better food systems

Showing results for: Aquaculture

5 September 2014

A recent issue of The Global Food Security (GFS) programme’s Insight series, which intends to provide a “balanced analysis of food related research for use by policy-makers and practitioners”, explores aquatic farming in the UK. 

12 March 2014

This research shows that it is possible to modify plant seeds to produce omega 3 fatty acids. Through a process of  genetic modification,  the research modifies the plant Camelina sativa  (false flax) with genes from microalgae – the main producers of the omega 3 fatty acids DHA  and  EPA.  The oil extracted from the seeds can then be used as a more sustainable alternative to fish oils.

14 February 2014

A new joint report by World Bank, FAO and the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) entitled "Fish to 2030: Prospects for Fisheries and Aquaculture” looks at prospects for fisheries and aquaculture and suggests that aquaculture will provide close to two thirds of global food fish consumption by 2030. It highlights the continuing role of  China as a major driver of aquaculture demand, and charts the decline in the relative importance of capture fisheries.

6 February 2014

In this briefing paper by IIED, Essam Yassin Mohammed argues that sustainable fisheries must be central to the new global development goals (SDGs) of 2015. This could either be realised by providing goals and targets for the fisheries themselves in the agenda — or by making them part of a broader set of goals that focus on food security and livelihoods.

10 January 2014

This 8 minute video from NERC (Natural Environment Research Council) features Kenny Black and Jo Gosling of the Scottish Association for Marine Science who discuss how fish farming might be made more sustainable.

21 October 2013

Aquaculture is an issue that rarely attracts the attention it deserves.  These short filmed interviews made by the  International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI feature researchers and practitioners in livestock and fish ‘value chains’ in Uganda who came together during a conference on AgriFood Chain Toolkit Conference-Livestock and Fish Value Chains in East Africa, in September Sep 2013.

24 July 2013

SEAT, the Sustaining Ethical Aquaculture Trade project have highlighted some key ‘myths’ around aquaculture on their website and sought to provide some clarity on the reality of the situation.

7 January 2013

A new book entitled “Principles of Sustainable Aquaculture: Promoting Social, Economic and Environmental Resilience” by Stuart W. Bunting of the Centre for Environment and Society at the University of Essex serves as an advanced level textbook focusing on developing more sustainable aquaculture practices. 

25 October 2012

The UK’s New Economics Foundation has written a report arguing that all fishing in Europe should cease for up to nine years to let stocks recover. 

9 May 2012

This paper fish demand in 2050 will be met but only if fish resources are managed sustainably and the animal feeds industry reduces its reliance on wild fish.

9 March 2012

The Scottish Aquaculture Research Forum has published a study on Scottish produced suspended mussels and intertidal oysters.

The study considered the cradle-to-gate impacts of the shellfish, from spat collection in the case of mussels, and hatching in the case of oysters, through  growing, harvesting, depuration, and packing ready for dispatch.  To illustrate the carbon impacts of the full life cycle, a scenario is included that,  based on various assumptions, illustrates the potential impacts of distribution, retail, consumption and disposal of the shells. 

6 December 2011

John Forster, an FCRN mailing list member, has written two very interesting articles on aquaculture for the UK Research Councils’ Food Security website www.foodsecurity.ac.uk

30 January 2009

In "Life cycle measures of biophysical sustainability in feed production for conventional and organic salmon aquaculture in the northeast pacific" it was found that the cumulative impacts of industrial society's high material/energy throughput compromise the stability of planetary biogeochemical cycles.

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